Public Health Emergency: Influenza 2013

Members of the U.S. Army receiving the flu vaccine. Source: Flickr Creative Commons, (C) U.S. Army

Members of the U.S. Army receiving the flu vaccine. Source: Flickr Creative Commons, (C) U.S. Army

Recently the State of New York and the City of Boston have both declared public health emergencies. A Pennsylvania hospital (Lehigh Valley) has set up surge tents outside the emergency rooms to handle any patients with a fever. While last year’s flu season was incredibly mild, this year has been very different. The flu is becoming much more widespread much earlier in the season, and the strain in question is causing severe illness. for example, in Boston 25% of reported cases (a case is reported any time someone tests positive, so any time you go to a doctor and get swabbed you are being tested, and those data are being reported) are requiring hospitalization.

What is a Public Health Emergency?

Essentially, a Public Health Emergency is declared when a state or city (or the entire country) needs to release resources (monetary resources, vaccine stockpiles, healthcare providers, ect.) to handle a threat. These are bad situations (or imminent threats) requiring lots of people, supplies, and funds to deal with. For example, part of the emergency declaration in NYC allows pharmacists to give vaccines to children between the ages of 6 months and 18 years. Ordinarily  pharmacists can only administer vaccines to adults, but since children are considered an at-risk group for severe influenza the emergency declaration waived that regulation. Continue reading

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